Wearing Biblical Glasses

We all wear glasses! In fact, there are only two kinds of glasses in an ultimate sense. We either wear God’s glasses or man’s glasses. As explained in the “Starting Points” room at the Creation Museum, there are only two starting points for our worldviews: one either starts with God’s Word or man’s word. Ultimately, there are only two religions in the world: one is based on God’s Word (the Bible), and the other is based on man’s word.

Dr. Georgia Purdom—AiG speaker, writer, and researcher—wrote a blog post about how she teaches children to understand the concept of wearing biblical glasses. This is just one of the ways we help to educate kids to ensure they don’t put on the wrong secular glasses (man’s glasses). In her blog post, she states the following:

We are using the Answers for Kids curriculum in Sunday school class and have been talking a lot about viewing the world beginning with the Bible. When I point to my eye, they tell me that God was the only eyewitness to creation so we should trust His account given to us in Genesis. I often hold up the Bible to my face and talk about looking at the world starting with the Bible. However, since the Bible is solid and you can’t “see” through it, I thought of a fun way to illustrate this concept.

She then explains how to illustrate the glasses concept to children:

I bought some inexpensive sunglasses and some Christian themed foam stickers (I think it cost less than $5 total). I had the kids decorate the glasses on Sunday and told them that every time I say, “When we start with the Bible . . .” or “Look at the world through our biblical glasses . . .” that they are to put on their decorated sunglasses or “biblical glasses.” I hope this will reinforce the idea that the world looks different when we start with the truth of God’s Word rather than our own ideas or those of others.

She then shows a photograph of the kids wearing their glasses. I encourage you to read Georgia’s entire blog post and see the photograph.

Thanks for stopping by and thanks for praying,

Ken