A “Revealing” TV Series on the Bible

I strongly encourage you to read our lead article on the web today. It’s a review of the first episode of a new History Channel TV series titled Bible Secrets Revealed. I have received so many Facebook comments from people asking AiG to comment on this series, so Dr. Elizabeth Mitchell has written an excellent critique of the initial episode, concluding that the program contains many misrepresentations.

While the program states that the Bible is the most influential book ever written, it also declares that it is a compilation of 66 books that contain flawed accounts together with fictional stories—yet with a good purpose, they say! Even the Dead Sea Scrolls are put forward as evidence that the Bible has errors. But as we have stated often on this website and elsewhere, the Scrolls are actually a testimony as to how the Old Testament was accurately preserved. Dr. Mitchell discusses this in her article.

Furthermore, the program doubts the authorship of the first five books of the Old Testament (the Pentateuch, as it’s called) and says that Moses’s authorship is now “questioned by most scholars.” Of course, Jesus Christ the Word told us who wrote these five books (see John 5:45–47).

Not surprisingly, the program’s “expert” on the creation account in Genesis declares that since nobody was present at creation, it can’t be historical because there were no eyewitnesses. Well, what about God the Creator who was there as the only eyewitness? And He told us about His creation in His book, the Bible. Other parts of Genesis are also dismissed by the “experts” as not historical (e.g., Adam and Eve).

As Dr. Mitchell shares in her review, if the Bible is really reliable (and it is), then those who reject its truths are not only wrong in their opinions, but they are also commanded by Scripture to repent and trust the Savior who is presented in the Bible. Not taking God at His Word has eternal consequences.

You can read the article on our website.

Thanks for stopping by and thanks for praying,

Ken